Events List

Below is list of upcoming events for your site.



List of Events

Relevance and Sustainability: The Future of Holocaust Museums   View Event

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2020 at 12:30pm - 1:30pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  Liberation75 and Museum of Eternal Faith & Resilience present: Relevance and Sustainability: THE FUTURE OF HOLOCAUST MUSEUMS Join world experts for a FREE online discussion about the future of Holocaust museums!FEATURINGDr. Michael Berenbaum, Conceptual Development of Museums and Historical Films, Scholar and Writer Paul Salmons, Curator, Pedagogue and Education Consultant Dr. Piotr Cywinski, Museum Director of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Alice Herscovitch, Consultant for Donor and Government Relations at the Montreal Holocaust Museum Dr. Eyal Kaminka, Director of International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem Zev Lanton, Director of International Relations at the Museum of Eternal Faith and Resilience Dr. Edna Frieberg, Senior Program Curator of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Tali Nates, Founder & Director of the Johannesburg Holocaust & Genocide Centre Register here.

New Holocaust Education Activities in ADL's No Place for Hate® Activity Library   View Event

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2020 at 3:00pm - 4:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Webinar
  • Description:  With hate on the rise, it is important that schools have a framework to help students challenge bias. During this webinar, learn more about ADL’s equitable school climate program, No Place for Hate®, and the new Echoes & Reflections activities it will be adding in its online library to explore Holocaust education themes with students. With public displays of hate on the rise, it is more important than ever for schools to commit to programs that clearly define expectations in behavior for all members of the community and provide a framework in which you can design an approach to learning skills to challenge bias and bullying. During this webinar, learn more about ADL’s equitable school climate program for schools, No Place for Hate®, which will be adding new pre-approved activities in its online library to explore Holocaust education themes with your students and school community. Echoes & Reflections’ lead content developer will model these engaging activities on the topics of personal identity through the lens of the Holocaust, as well as propaganda and media literacy skills using the Holocaust as a case study. Register here.

Holocaust Museum Houston: Film Screening of "Adio Kerida" and Q&A with Dr. Ruth Behar   View Event

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2020 at 6:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Calendar:   Films
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the third event in their 2020 Latinx Heritage Month Virtual Lecture and Film Series. This month, Holocaust Museum Houston will be hosting authors and scholars who have contributed to highlighting Latinx history, identity, culture, and cross-cultural collaborations. Adio Kerida is a documentary about the search for identity and history among Sephardic Jews with roots in Cuba. The title is borrowed from a Sephardic love song in order to highlight the themes of expulsion, departure, and exile that are at the crux of the Sephardic legacy. At the same time, the title invokes the creative energy that is injected into a culture when it crosses racial, ethnic, and national lines. It also has a personal dimension and references the desire for reconciliation between the filmmaker and her Sephardic father. Director/Filmmaker Ruth Behar is the Victor Haim Perera Collegiate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellows Award, she is known for her interdisciplinary thinking about the search for home in our global era and her bold approach to writing in blurred genres that mix ethnography, memoir, fiction, and poetry. Ruth frequently visits and writes about her native Cuba is the author of An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba and Traveling Heavy: A Memoir in between Journeys. This film will be followed by a Q&A with Dr. Ruth Behar. Admission is free and open to the public. Donations are welcomed. Guests will receive a private Zoom link so advance registration is required. Register here.

Civil Discourse Series: Social Media and Society   View Event

  • Thursday, October 1, 2020 at 7:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Calendar:   Speaking Engagements
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The conversation will take place on the online platform Zoom. A link to join will be sent to registered guests via email one hour before the start of the program. In today’s society, news and information increasingly circulate through platforms like Facebook and Twitter. Join the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum for a conversation addressing the critical issues around social media. In a space where misinformation and bias are so common, how do we engage with each other online in a civil and informed manner? What level of control should social media platforms exert over the content shared on their platforms? Is it their responsibility to regulate or call attention to misinformation or bias in posts, images, and ads, or is it solely up to users to engage with social media critically? Join the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum for a conversation moderated by Lata Nott, attorney and Fellow for the First Amendment at the Freedom Forum, with Jameel Jaffer, Executive Director of the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University; Amy S. Mitchell, Director of Journalism Reserach at Pew Research Center; and Dave Sifry, Vice President of the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) for the Anti-Defamation League. The program will include a special introduction from Joel Schwitzer, Regional Director, AJC Dallas. Space is limited! Please register for one ticket per device used. About the PanelistsJameel Jaffer is the Executive Director of the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University. Under his leadership, the Institute has filed precedent-setting litigation, undertaken major interdisciplinary research initiatives, and become an influential voice in debates about the freedoms of speech and the press in the digital age. Until August 2016, Jaffer served as deputy legal director at the ACLU, where he oversaw the organization’s work on free speech, privacy, technology, national security, and international human rights. Jaffer is a graduate of Williams College, Cambridge University, and Harvard Law School. Amy S. Mitchell is Director of Journalism Research at Pew Research Center. She is responsible for the Center’s research related to news and information, including how the public accesses, engages with and creates news, what news organizations are providing, and how technology is changing all of these elements. Mitchell is an expert in research design, methods evaluation, analysis and writing. She specializes in how technology is changing the flow of news information today and the influence of political identity on news choices. Prior to joining Pew Research Center, Mitchell was a congressional research associate at the American Enterprise Institute. Dave Sifry is Vice President of the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) for the Anti-Defamation League. In this role, Sifry leads a team developing proactive solutions and producing cutting-edge research to protect vulnerable populations. In its efforts to advocate change at all levels of society, CTS serves as a vital resource to legislators, journalists, universities, community organizations, tech platforms and anyone who has been a target of online hate and harassment. Sifry joined ADL in 2019 after a storied career as a technology entrepreneur and executive, founding six companies including Linuxcare and Technorati. About the ModeratorLata Nott is an attorney with expertise in the intersection of law, technology, and expression. She is a Fellow for the First Amendment at the Freedom Forum, an organization dedicated to fostering First Amendment freedoms for all. Nott formerly was the assistant director of admissions at the Georgetown University Law Center. Prior to that, she was a litigator in New York City where she maintained an active pro-bono practice focused on asylum cases and developed a proficiency in legal issues surrounding the Internet, data privacy, and cybersecurity. She graduated from the University of California, Davis, summa cum laude, with a Bachelor of Arts in international relations. She earned her Juris Doctor from Columbia Law School in 2010. Register here.

Teaching the Holocaust, Empowering Students - 3 Part Program   View Event

  • Monday, October 5, 2020 (all day)
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Webinar
  • Description:  Our recent survey of U.S. college students shows Holocaust education is effective in building empathy, tolerance, and open mindedness. Join Echoes & Reflections' October Online Course to gain the knowledge and tools to teach the lessons of the Holocaust and make a difference in your students' lives and guide them to build a better future. Three interactive learning modules released over three weeks. Module I: First Week of the Course Module II: Second Week of the Course Module III: Third Week of the Course Optional Final Project due the Fourth Week of the CourseThis program introduces learners to:Classroom-ready comprehensive print and online resourcesSound pedagogy for teaching about the HolocaustInstructional pathways to help students learn about the complex history of the HolocaustBackground information on the history of antisemitismStrategies to incorporate a range of primary sources, including visual history testimony, to classroom instruction All the Details:Program includes three interactive modules released over three weeksApproximately 6 hours to complete in total – at no costProceed at your own pace each week, be supported by an instructor, and enjoy interaction with other educatorsReceive a certificate of completion and join a network of educators teaching about the Holocaust and genocideFinal module includes additional time to complete optional project for a 10-hour certificate

Who Speaks: Poetry, Performance & the Parsley Massacre of 1937 with Jasminne Méndez   View Event

  • Tuesday, October 6, 2020 at 6:00pm - 7:00pm
  • Calendar:   Speaking Engagements
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the fourth lecture in their 2020 Latinx Heritage Month Virtual Lecture and Film Series. This month, Holocaust Museum Houston will be hosting authors and scholars who have contributed to highlighting Latinx history, identity, culture, and cross-cultural collaborations. The 1937 Haitian Massacre was a mass killing that took place October 2 - 5 1937 against Haitians living along the Dominican Republic's northwestern frontier and in certain parts of the contiguous Cibao region. Dominican Army troops known as la guardia came from different areas of the country and carried out the massacre on the orders of Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo. In this multimedia presentation and poetry reading, author, educator and performer Jasminne Méndez will discuss the history of the events leading up to the Haitian Massacre and the devastating physical and psychological impact it left on both Haitians and Dominicans in its aftermath. Jasminne will also discuss her own connection to the massacre and her creative process while writing and assembling her forthcoming book Machete which uses persona poems and performance techniques to tell the story of the massacre. Jasminne Méndez is a poet, educator and award-winning author. She is the author of two poetry/prose collections Island of Dreams (Floricanto Press, 2013) which won an International Latino Book Award, and Night-Blooming Jasmin(n)e: Personal Essays and Poetry (Arte Publico Press, 2018). She is an MFA graduate of the creative writing program at the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University and a University of Houston alumni. Her second YA memoir, A Bucket of Dirty Water: Memories of my Girlhood, and her debut picture book, Josefina’s Habichuelas (Arte Público Press), will be released in 2021. Admission is free and open to the public. Donations are welcomed. Advance registration is required, as guests will receive a private Zoom link. Register here.

Exploring Migration before and after the Holocaust   View Event

  • Wednesday, October 7, 2020 at 3:00pm - 4:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Webinar
  • Description:  Why do people leave their homes? What is the meaning of borders? As an educator, what is my responsibility in constructing welcoming and inclusive communities? Using the Re-Imagining Migration Learning Framework, as well as the Echoes & Reflections principles of pedagogy, this webinar will prepare teachers to explore how they can discuss the theme of migration before and after the Holocaust. Echoes & Reflections will ground this conversation in the escalation of hate in Nazi Germany, the need - and lack - of international intervention during the Holocaust. Re-imagining Migration will focus on utilizing their learning arc, resources, and pedagogy to engage in these conversations in today’s classroom. Register here.

Part 1: Analyzing Propaganda and Teaching Media Literacy: The Holocaust as a Case Study   View Event

  • Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 2:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The Institute of Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Raritan Valley Community College, with facilitation by Echoes & Reflections, will present a FREE two-part workshop on propaganda and media literacy, utilizing the Holocaust as a case study. Facilitated by Echoes & Reflections. This is a joint program of ADL, USC Shoah Foundation, and Yad Vashem. Free 2-Day Online Program for 3 Hr Professional Development Credits This is one program divided into two days. To participate registration needs to been done for October 8th & October 15th. Media literacy skills have become essential for young people to successfully navigate and critically assess the ever-increasing amount of information they receive throughout their day - on social media, advertisements, television, and film. Therefore, it is crucial for students to comprehend and identify how media, both historically and in contemporary society, can be used as a tool to incite hate and violence against certain groups. This learning opportunity examines the events of the Holocaust through the lens of media, by examining propaganda deployed by the Nazis to discriminate against Jews and other minorities. Educators will gain the tools to facilitate classroom discussions on the role and impact of Nazi propaganda during the Holocaust and support their students to critically analyze media in today’s world. Register here.

Nazi Persecution of Non-Jewish Groups: Sinti and Roma   View Event

  • Monday, October 12, 2020 at 2:00pm - 3:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Webinar
  • Description:  As part of the Nazi world view of "restructuring" Europe, ethnic groups such as the Sinti and Roma were branded as a dangerous threat and were violently targeted. This webinar, presented by Dr. David Deutsch, a Yad Vashem educator, will focus on the persecution of this group. Register here.

Holocaust Museum Houston: An Evening with Dr. Gabriela González   View Event

  • Monday, October 12, 2020 at 6:00pm - 7:00pm
  • Calendar:   Speaking Engagements
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the fifth and final lecture in their 2020 Latinx Heritage Month Virtual Lecture and Film Series. Over the last month, Holocaust Museum Houston has hosted authors and scholars who have contributed to highlighting Latinx history, identity, culture, and cross-cultural collaborations. Dr. González will speak about her book Redeeming La Raza: Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights. This book examines the gendered and class-conscious political activism of Mexican-origin people in Texas from 1900 to 1950. In particular, it questions the inter-generational agency of Mexicans and Mexican Americans who subscribed to particular race, ethnic, class, and gender ideologies as they encountered barriers and obstacles in a society that often treated Mexicans as a nonwhite minority. Middle-class trans-border activists sought to redeem the Mexican masses from body politic exclusions in part by encouraging them to become identified with the nation-state. Redeeming la raza was as much about saving them from traditional modes of thought and practices that were perceived as hindrances to progress as it was about saving them from race and class-based forms of discrimination that were part and parcel of modernity. Dr. Gabriela González is associate professor of history at the University of Texas at San Antonio where she teaches courses on the US-Mexico borderlands, Latinx history, women’s history and historical methods. She received her Ph.D. in U.S. history from Stanford University in 2005 and is a Ford Foundation Diversity Fellow. This event is pre-recorded and will be followed by a LIVE Q&A with Dr. Gabriela González Admission is free and open to the public. Donations are welcomed. Guests will receive a private Zoom link so advance registration is required. Register here.

History Highlights: The Holodomor - The Forgotten Genocide   View Event

  • Tuesday, October 13, 2020 at 7:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The conversation will take place on the online platform Zoom. A link to join will be sent to registered guests via email one hour before the start of the program. From 1932 to 1933, Josef Stalin and the government of the Soviet Union deliberately created a famine in Ukraine. Through collectivization and forced exports, with the purpose of destroying Ukrainian nationalism and those who opposed Stalin’s rule, Ukraine was stripped of the grain that fed its population. Millions of Ukrainians died of starvation. Join Dr. Sara Abosch-Jacobson, Chief Education Officer, for an introduction to the Holodomor. The History Highlights series features Holocaust and human rights topics presented by Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum historians and educators. Space is limited! Please register for one ticket per device used. This program is recommended for high school students and adults. About Dr. Sara Abosch-JacobsonDr. Sara Abosch-Jacobson is the Chief Education, Programs, and Exhibitions Officer for the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum. An experienced educator, she has researched, taught and written on Jewish culture and history. She holds a PhD in modern European and Jewish history, an MA in modern British and Jewish history, and an MA in Political Science with a concentration in Civil/Military Relations. Register here.

Islamophobia and Antisemitism: Challenges and Bridges   View Event

  • Wednesday, October 14, 2020 at 10:30am - 11:30am
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The Center for Holocaust, Human Rights & Genocide Education's (chhange) October Virtual Lunch & Learn, Islamophobia and Antisemitism: Challenges and Bridges, will be led by Dr. Mehnaz Afridi of Manhattan College. Dr. Afridi will discuss historical, political, and religious dimensions of antisemitism and Islamophobia. She will share her work on both and display the ways in which this racism has resurfaced in the United States and Europe. In Shoah through Muslim Eyes, her last book, she discusses her journey with Judaism as a Muslim. Her work is based on the struggle of antisemitism within Muslim communities and her interviews with survivors. She hopes to create bridges between Jews and Muslims by showing the similarities and challenges. Dr. Mehnaz Afridi is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Director of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College. She teaches courses on Islam, the Holocaust, Genocide, and issues of gender within Islam. Her recent book Shoah through Muslim Eyes (Academic Studies Press, 2017) was nominated for the Yad Vashem International Book Prize for Holocaust Research and the Jacob Schnitzer Book Award. She is currently working on a book, The Wounded Muslim, (Lexington Books, 2023). In 2019 she was awarded the Costello Award for teaching excellence in the School of Liberal Arts at Manhattan College. Dr. Afridi obtained her PhD from University of South Africa, her M.A. and B.A. from Syracuse University.1 hour of Professional Development Provided. Pre-registration is required for Zoom URL. Register here.Admission is FREE for Chhange Members & Brookdale CC Students and Staff. Suggested donation of $10 for Non-Members. Click here to become a member.

Part 2: Analyzing Propaganda and Teaching Media Literacy: The Holocaust as a Case Study   View Event

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020 at 2:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The Institute of Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Raritan Valley Community College, with facilitation by Echoes & Reflections, will present a FREE two-part workshop on propaganda and media literacy, utilizing the Holocaust as a case study. Facilitated by Echoes & Reflections. This is a joint program of ADL, USC Shoah Foundation, and Yad Vashem. Free 2-Day Online Program for 3 Hr Professional Development Credits This is one program divided into two days. To participate registration needs to been done for October 8th & October 15th. Media literacy skills have become essential for young people to successfully navigate and critically assess the ever-increasing amount of information they receive throughout their day - on social media, advertisements, television, and film. Therefore, it is crucial for students to comprehend and identify how media, both historically and in contemporary society, can be used as a tool to incite hate and violence against certain groups. This learning opportunity examines the events of the Holocaust through the lens of media, by examining propaganda deployed by the Nazis to discriminate against Jews and other minorities. Educators will gain the tools to facilitate classroom discussions on the role and impact of Nazi propaganda during the Holocaust and support their students to critically analyze media in today’s world. Register here.

Movie Monday Film Discussion: First They Killed My Father   View Event

  • Monday, October 19, 2020 at 7:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Calendar:   Films
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The conversation will take place on the online platform Zoom. A link to join will be sent to registered guests via email one hour before the start of the program. Join the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum every third Monday of the month for a discussion on Holocaust and human rights films moderated by Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum historians, film professionals, and other experts. It is encouraged that participants watch the film on their own before engaging in the discussion. October's discussion on First They Killed My Father will be moderated by Dr. Charlotte Decoster, Director of Education at the Museum. First They Killed My Father is available to stream on Netflix with subscription. Please register for one ticket per device used. About Dr. Charlotte DecosterDr. Charlotte Decoster is the Director of Education for the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum. An experienced educator, she has researched, taught, and written on Holocaust history. She holds a PhD in History from the University of North Texas. She regularly speaks on the Holocaust, children and child rescue during the Holocaust, and in Nazi Germany. She has travelled throughout the U.S. to give talks on Anne Frank and child rescue during the Holocaust. About First They Killed My FatherLoung Ung was 5 years old when the Khmer Rouge seized power in Cambodia in 1975. The regime soon began a four-year reign of terror and genocide in which nearly 2 million Cambodians died. Forced from her family's home in Phnom Penh, Ung was trained as a child soldier while her six siblings were sent to labor camps. Register here.

From Swastika to Jim Crow   View Event

  • Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 3:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Calendar:   Workshops
  • Location:  Zoom
  • Description:  The little-known story of Jewish intellectuals who escaped Nazi Germany to the US in the 1930s. Confronted with antisemitism at American universities and public distrust of foreigners, they secured teaching positions at traditionally black colleges in the then-segregated South. Drawing on resources from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Register here.